Swiss canton braces for tsunami

 

page11-nature_logoTHE land of chocolate and clocks could soon be known for something quite different: tsunamis. Authorities in Nidwalden, a canton in landlocked Switzerland, are factoring the risk of a tsunami in Lake Lucerne into their hazard plans. It is the first official acknowledgement of such a threat in Europe’s Alpine region — and comes in step with findings that the risk of tsunamis in the area, which is home to around 13 million people, is much higher than previously thought…

This article was first published in Nature on 4 September 2014. To continue reading, click here.

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Wonder food

ns_logoIN April 1789, Lieutenant William Bligh set off from the Pacific island of Tahiti to sail halfway round the world to Jamaica. Twenty-three days into the voyage, his crew mutinied. They set him adrift in the Bounty’s launch, along with 18 men who were loyal to him, and dumped the ship’s cargo overboard. That cargo included 1000 breadfruit plants destined for the Jamaican sugar plantations, whose owners were clamouring for a cheap and reliable source of food for their slaves…

This article was first published in New Scientist on 28 June 2014. To continue reading, click here.

 

Le Livre sur les quais

The Morges literary festival is this year playing host to anglophone writers Val McDermid, Andy McNab, Louise Doughty and Martin Sixsmith – of Philomena fame – among others. I’ll be one of the lucky animatrices asking the questions. This festival just goes from strength to strength. The lakefront at Morges is a fabulous place to be when the sun is shining, which may be one reason why writers like to stop there come the rentrée. It runs over the weekend of 5-7 September and the programme is here. Entry is free.

 

The forgetting gene

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ONE day in 1991, neurologist Warren Strittmatter asked his boss to look at some bewildering data. Strittmatter was studying amyloid-β, the main component of the molecular clumps found in the brains of people with Alzheimer’s disease. He was hunting for amyloid-binding proteins in the fluid that buffers the brain and spinal cord, and had fished out one called apolipoprotein E (ApoE), which had no obvious connection with the disease…

This article was inspired by an Ernst Strüngmann forum on brain diseases in March 2014 and first published in Nature on 6 June 2014. To continue reading, click here.

The following is an excerpt from Louis Theroux’s 2012 BBC documentary Extreme Love: Dementia. Don’t miss the bit where Nancy comes into the room and says to her husband and Louis, “I want you.”